CACAO WAS NOT A FOOD EXCLUSIVE TO THE MAYA ELITE (Heritagedaily 09/29/2022)

The prevailing belief: Cacao was more available to, even controlled by, the society’s very upper echelons, royalty. Past efforts to identify cacao in ceramics focused on highly decorative vessels associated with elite ceremonial contexts — think ornate drinking vases — leading to assumptions about how cacao was distributed and who could access it. What about…

See the striking facial reconstruction of a Paleolithic woman who lived 31,000 years ago (Live Science 09/28/2022)

In 1881, archaeologists unearthed the skull of a human buried inside a cave in Mladeč, a village in what is now the Czech Republic. At the time, researchers dated the skull to about 31,000 years ago and classified the individual as male. But they were wrong about the Stone Age person’s sex, a new study…

ROMAN MOSAIC RE-EXPOSED BY ARCHAEOLOGISTS IN FOLKESTONE (Heritagedaily 09/22/2022)

The mosaic is part of the central dining room from a large 2nd century villa complex situated on the cliffs overlooking Folkestone, England. Beneath the Roman foundations are traces of an earlier Iron Age settlement, occupied by native Britons centuries before the Roman invasion. The complex was first excavated by archaeologists in 1924, however, the…

ARCHAEOLOGISTS UNCOVER SARCOPHAGUS OF HIGH-RANKING OFFICIAL FROM REIGN OF RAMESES II (Heritagedaily 09/21/2022)

Excavations were led by Dr. Ola Al-Ajizi from the Faculty of Archaeology at Cairo University, part of a study over the 2021-2022 work season to excavate the areas around the ascending corridor of the pyramid of King Unas. The team found a burial chamber containing the sarcophagus of Ptah-em-uya, a high-ranking official who was the…

Neanderthals died out 40,000 years ago, but there has never been more of their DNA on Earth (Phys.org 09/05/2022)

Neanderthals have served as a reflection of our own humanity since they were first discovered in 1856. What we think we know about them has been shaped and molded to fit our cultural trends, social norms and scientific standards. They have changed from diseased specimens to primitive sub-human lumbering cousins to advanced humans.

ARCHAEOLOGICAL SITE REVEALS NEW INSIGHTS INTO ETRUSCAN IDENTITY (Heritagedaily 09/01/2022)

The site was discovered in 2017 during a construction project, revealing a settlement and associated burials, which was investigated by researchers at the time but never published. The settlement is one of few Etruscan sites untouched by looters in antiquity or modernity, allowing researchers to analyse grave goods that are relatively intact, and further understand…